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  • U.S. monitored the phone calls of 35 world leaders: report

    Reuters) - The United States monitored the phone conversations of 35 world leaders according to classified documents leaked by fugitive whistleblower Edward Snowden, Britain's Guardian newspaper said on Thursday.

    Phone numbers were passed on to the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) by an official in another government department, according to the documents, the Guardian said on its website.

    It added that staff in the White House, State Department and the Pentagon were urged to share the contact details of foreign politicians.

    More: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...99N19W20131024

  • #2
    Obama promises changes after latest NSA snooping disclosure

    Washington (CNN) -- Under fire about disclosures of broad National Security Agency snooping on global leaders, President Barack Obama is offering a two-pronged response: You do it, too, and we'll make some changes.

    Thousands of documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden have portrayed the vast reach of U.S. surveillance activities, keeping tabs not only on U.S. call data but also global Internet and e-mail traffic.

    More: http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/25/politi...html?hpt=hp_t1

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    • #3
      Merkel's call to Obama: are you bugging my phone?

      The furore over the scale of American mass surveillance revealed by Edward Snowden shifted to an incendiary new level on Wednesday evening when Angela Merkel of Germany called Barack Obama to demand explanations over reports that the US National Security Agency was monitoring her mobile phone.


      Merkel was said by informed sources in Germany to be "livid" over the reports and convinced, on the basis of a German intelligence investigation, that the reports were utterly substantiated.

      More: http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...-merkel-german


      More related news: http://www.ottawabusinessguide.com/f...-spying-report

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      • #4
        NSA 'tracked Merkel's phone for 10 years'

        New claims emerged last night over the extent that US intelligence agencies have been monitoring the mobile phone of Angela Merkel. The allegations were made after German secret service officials were already preparing to travel to Washington to seek explanations into the alleged surveillance of its chancellor.


        A report in Der Spiegel said Merkel's mobile number had been listed by the NSA's Special Collection Service (SCS) since 2002 and may have been monitored for more than 10 years. It was still on the list – marked as "GE Chancellor Merkel" – weeks before President Barack Obama visited Berlin in June.


        More: http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...-un-resolution

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        • #5
          U.S. NSA spied on 60 million Spanish phone calls in a month: report

          (Reuters) - The U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) recently tracked over 60 million calls in Spain in the space of a month, a Spanish newspaper said on Monday, citing a document which it said formed part of papers obtained from ex-NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

          Spain's government has so far said it was not aware its citizens had been spied on by the NSA, which has been accused of accessing tens of thousands of French phone records and monitoring the phone of German chancellor Angela Merkel.

          Spain on Friday resisted calls from Germany for the European Union's 28 member states to reach a "no-spy deal", similar to an agreement Berlin and Paris are seeking, though Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy said the country was looking for more information.


          More: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...99R0AJ20131028

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          • #6
            German paper says Obama aware of spying on Merkel since 2010

            (Reuters) - A German newspaper said on Sunday that U.S. President Barack Obama knew his intelligence service was eavesdropping on Angela Merkel as long ago as 2010, contradicting reports that he had told the German leader he did not know.

            Germany received information this week that the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) had bugged Merkel's mobile phone, prompting Berlin to summon the U.S. ambassador, a move unprecedented in post-war relations between the close allies.

            Reuters was unable to confirm Sunday's news report. The NSA denied that Obama had been informed about the operation by the NSA chief in 2010, as reported by the German newspaper. But the agency did not comment directly on whether Obama knew about the bugging of Merkel's phone.


            More: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...99Q09F20131028

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            • #7
              White House stopped phone tapping of foreign leaders this summer

              (CNN) -- The White House learned this summer that the National Security Agency had tapped the phones of world leaders and ordered a halt to some of the eavesdropping, The Wall Street Journal reported Sunday.

              Quoting unidentified U.S. officials, the newspaper's website said the wiretapping of about 35 foreign leaders was disclosed to the White House as part of a review of surveillance programs ordered by President Barack Obama after NSA contractor Edward Snowden leaked classified details of the NSA's phone monitoring systems.


              More: http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/28/politi...html?hpt=hp_t1
              Last edited by Newsman; 10-28-2013, 01:52 PM.

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              • #8
                Spain summons US ambassador over spying

                Spain has summoned the US ambassador to discuss alleged spying on Spanish citizens and said that, if true, the action was unacceptable behaviour by an ally.

                Earlier, Spanish newspaper El Mundo said the NSA recently tracked over 60 million calls in Spain in the space of a month, citing a document which it said formed part of papers obtained from ex-NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

                "Spain has relayed to the United States the importance of preserving a climate of trust...and its interest in understanding the full reach of practices that, if true, would be considered inappropriate and unacceptable between allies," the Spanish foreign ministry said in a statement.


                More: http://www.aljazeera.com/news/europe...651533825.html

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                • #9
                  U.S. spy chiefs face Congress amid spying rift with Europe


                  (Reuters) - When top U.S. intelligence officials testified at a congressional hearing weeks ago, the public uproar was over the National Security Agency collecting the phone and email records of Americans.

                  But when the NSA director and other spy chiefs appear at a House Intelligence Committee hearing on Tuesday it will be against a backdrop of angry European allies accusing the United States of spying on their leaders and citizens.

                  The most prominent target appears to have been German Chancellor Angela Merkel, whose mobile phone was allegedly tapped by the NSA.


                  More: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...99S03N20131029

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                  • #10
                    Spy scandal weighs on U.S. tech firms in China, Cisco takes hit

                    (Reuters) - U.S. technology companies including Cisco Systems Inc and IBM Corp are facing unprecedented difficulties selling their goods and services in China, as fallout from the U.S. spying scandal starts to take a toll.

                    Cisco said on Wednesday that its revenue would drop 10 percent this quarter, and continue to contract until the middle of 2014, in part due to a backlash in China against revelations about U.S. government surveillance programs worldwide.

                    "The U.S. government isn't doing any favors for Cisco," said Evercore Partners analyst Mark McKechnie, after the company's shares fell 10 percent in late trade.


                    More: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...9AD0J420131114

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                    • #11
                      Norway denies U.S. spying, said it shared intelligence with U.S.

                      (Reuters) - Norway's intelligence services said it - and not the U.S. National Security Agency, as reported in a Norwegian newspaper - kept records on more than 33 million phone conversations over the space of one month last winter, Oslo said on Tuesday.

                      The daily Dagbladet said the U.S. NSA spied on close NATO ally Norway, collecting data about Norwegian phone conversations last December and January.

                      "This is data collection by Norwegian intelligence to support Norwegian military operations in conflict areas abroad, or connected to the fight against terrorism, also abroad," Lieutenant General Kjell Grandhagen, head of the Norwegian Intelligence Service, told a news conference.

                      "This was not data collection from Norway against Norway, but Norwegian data collection that is shared with the Americans."

                      Dagbladet's report, based on documents made public by fugitive former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, was co-authored by Glenn Greenwald, the former Guardian journalist who brought Snowden's leaks to world attention.


                      Source: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...9AI0D920131119

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                      • #12
                        U.S. spy agency gathers data on cellphone locations globally: report

                        (Reuters) - The National Security Agency gathers nearly 5 billion records a day on the location of mobile telephones worldwide, including those of some Americans, the Washington Post reported on Wednesday, citing sources including documents obtained by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

                        The records feed a database that stores information about the locations of "at least hundreds of millions of devices," the newspaper said, according to the top-secret documents and interviews with intelligence officials.

                        The report said the NSA does not target Americans' location data intentionally, but acquires a substantial amount of information on the whereabouts of domestic cellular telephones "incidentally."

                        More: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...9B31AM20131204

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                        • #13
                          FBI’s search for ‘Mo,’ suspect in bomb threats, highlights use of malware for surveillance

                          The man who called himself “Mo” had dark hair, a foreign accent and — if the pictures he e-mailed to federal investigators could be believed — an Iranian military uniform. When he made a series of threats to detonate bombs at universities and airports across a wide swath of the United States last year, police had to scramble every time.

                          Mo remained elusive for months, communicating via *e-mail, video chat and an *Internet-based phone service without revealing his true identity or location, court documents show. So with no house to search or telephone to tap, investigators turned to a new kind of surveillance tool delivered over the Internet.

                          More: http://www.washingtonpost.com/busine...y.html?hpid=z1

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                          • #14
                            State surveillance of personal data is theft, say world's leading authors

                            More than 500 of the world's leading authors, including five Nobel prize winners, have condemned the scale of state surveillance revealed by the whistleblower

                            Edward Snowden and warned that spy agencies are undermining democracy and must be curbed by a new international charter.

                            The signatories, who come from 81 different countries and include Margaret Atwood, Don DeLillo, Orham Pamuk, Günter Grass and Arundhati Roy, say the capacity of intelligence agencies to spy on millions of people's digital communications is turning everyone into potential suspects, with worrying implications for the way societies work.

                            They have urged the United Nations to create an international bill of digital rights that would enshrine the protection of civil rights in the internet age.

                            More: http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...eading-authors

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                            • #15
                              By cracking cellphone code, NSA has capacity for decoding private conversations

                              The cellphone encryption technology used most widely across the world can be easily defeated by the National Security Agency, an internal document shows, giving the agency the means todecode most of the billions of calls and texts that travel over public airwaves every day.

                              While the military and law enforcement agencies long have been able to hack into individual cellphones, the NSA’s capability appears to be far more sweeping because of the agency’s global signals collection operation. The agency’s ability to crack encryption used by the majority of cellphones in the world offers it wide-ranging powers to listen in on private conversations.


                              More: http://www.washingtonpost.com/busine...y.html?hpid=z1

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