Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Canada Business 2017: Duties must remain on dumped U.S. drywall imports Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Canada Business 2017: Duties must remain on dumped U.S. drywall imports

    The Canadian International Trade Tribunal is ruling that barriers to cheap American drywall imports into Western Canada must continue.

    Preliminary duties of up to 276 per cent imposed last September are blamed by industry for price increases of 30 to 50 per cent on the construction material used extensively in commercial and residential buildings.

    The tribunal ruled Wednesday that American imports dumped in Canada have injured the Canadian industry. Its ruling means preliminary duties will be replaced with variable duties to be charged on imports that fall below a floor price established by the Canada Border Services Agency last month.



    More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/dryw...orts-1.3920515

  • #2
    Walmart strikes deal with Visa to settle credit card fee dispute

    A six-month spat between the world's largest retailer and the world's biggest credit card company is over, as Walmart has struck a deal with Visa that will see the latter's cards accepted at all of the chain's Canadian stores.

    The two companies announced the agreement on Thursday, but made no mention as to what concessions were made by whom to end the dispute.
    "Visa cardholders can once again use their Visa credit cards as a form of payment in all Walmart stores across Canada," Visa Canada spokeswoman Carla Hindman said in an email. Starting tomorrow, "Visa credit cards will be accepted at all Canadian Walmart stores, including in Manitoba and Thunder Bay, Ont."



    More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/visa-walmart-1.3923039

    Comment


    • #3
      With Alberta still in a slump, some oil industry players have an idea to get people back to work


      It's now 2½ years into the oil price downturn and, by most measures, Alberta is still in a rut.

      The economy is expected to come out of recession this year and oil prices are showing some strength, but there are still 215,000 people without a job, and as of December, more than 14,000 of them had been out of work for more than a year.


      At the same time, the province is dealing with an ongoing problem of abandoned and inactive oil and gas wells, which count in the tens of thousands. The Orphan Well Fund, which reclaims wells as a last resort in the case of bankruptcy, has seen its inventory of defunct wells skyrocket to nearly 1,400, from 162 in 2014.



      More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgar...ment-1.3924323

      Comment


      • #4
        Canadian banks off to record start on covered bond sales

        Canadian banks started their 2017 funding programs by selling a record amount of bonds backed by residential mortgages abroad, taking advantage of lower borrowing costs amid demand for their top-rated debt.

        The country’s biggest financial institutions have sold about $6 billion in covered bonds denominated in euros, U.S. dollars and pounds this year, the most on record for a year through Jan. 9. Bank of Montreal and Toronto-Dominion Bank have issued the most, with a $1.75 billion deal each, followed by a 1.25 billion euro ($1.32 billion) sale from the Bank of Nova Scotia, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.




        More: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...canada-s-banks

        Comment


        • #5
          Bank of Canada expected to stand firm on rates ahead of Trump presidency

          The Bank of Canada is widely expected to keep its key interest rate at 0.5 per cent this morning in its first interest rate decision of 2017 — but uncertainty over the future of the global economy after the inauguration of Donald Trump will likely complicate the central bank's ability to make policy decisions in the near future.

          "The hottest issue about the economy is what a new Trump administration might bring," said Avery Shenfeld, chief economist with CIBC. "But the Bank of Canada might try to be diplomatic and say less about that, waiting to see how things go."

          Canadians will also get a look at the central bank's official projections for economic growth, with the release of the first Monetary Policy Report of the year.



          More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/bank...rump-1.3939751

          Comment


          • #6
            Ring of Fire mining development still years away from delivering on a decade of hype


            Ten years after a large chromite deposit in Ontario's James Bay lowlands was first discovered and declared a "game-changer" for the Canadian economy, the Ring of Fire mining development is flaming out in a dispute over who is talking to whom.

            Noront Resources is now the main proponent in the project after Cliffs Natural Resources pulled out of the development in 2013, but it's relationship with one of the First Nations in the area continues to deteriorate.



            More:
            http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/ring-of-fire-talks-1.3955236

            Comment


            • #7
              U.S. cancels internet piracy notices while Canadians still get notices demanding settlement fees

              After years of frustration and less than stellar results, a major U.S. anti-piracy group has given up its campaign targeting internet pirates. But in Canada, the chase goes on.

              The U.S. Center for Copyright Information (CCI) has decided to stop sending warning alerts to Americans suspected of illegally downloading content.

              No clear reason was given for abandoning ship. But CCI member, the Motion Picture Association of America, said that while the alert system was effective, it failed to stop serious offenders.



              More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/noti...rnet-1.3960462

              Comment


              • #8
                Beef, pork prices continue downward slide


                Beef and pork livestock prices are plunging to levels not seen in several years, and the price tags in grocery store meat departments are beginning to fall as well.

                Cattle prices are at their lowest point in almost three years in Alberta, while the value of hogs is at a seven-year low.

                "Lower prices for cattle does mean lower prices for consumers, but not quite a one-to-one relationship," said Rob Roach, with the research team at ATB financial, an Alberta bank.



                More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/beef...hers-1.3963802

                Comment


                • #9
                  Solar-panel industry stuck in limbo waiting for Alberta government incentives


                  Geoff Domenico hoped 2016 would be a banner year for his solar-panel installation company, KCP Energy, with growth in residential solar panels expected to double in Alberta. In the end, sales actually fell for that side of the business.


                  The provincial government had said it would unveil an incentive program for people to use solar panels on their homes and garages. Such a policy could create a huge opportunity for the solar-panel industry in the province, but right now the sector is hurting as customers are wait for the government to roll out the details about the new policy.




                  More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/sola...lips-1.3969618

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Call for Alberta to put a time limit on inactive oil and gas wells

                    Inactive oil and gas wells remain an intractable problem in Alberta, but a report released this week suggests the solution is probably not that complicated. Alberta could simply follow in the steps of Texas and North Dakota and impose a time limit on how long a well can sit idle.

                    The province is sprinkled with old wells, more than 150,000 in varying degrees of decline.

                    Some have been orphaned, meaning their owners are out of business and can't clean up the problem; tens of thousands more have been abandoned and plugged with concrete, but not fully reclaimed; and 82,546 are inactive, meaning no more oil or natural gas is being produced, but the wells haven't been plugged and could, at least theoretically, be brought back to life.




                    More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgar...ells-1.3973018

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      'Check your ego': How to get a job in Alberta's recession

                      For years, Calgary was a great place to go if you needed a job. It had the highest wages in the country — especially for oilpatch workers — and the buoyant job market helped draw more than 300,000 people to the city over the past 10 years.

                      That great job market was a blessing, but has a downside, in that career counsellors and headhunters are finding that job expectations remain too high, more than two years into a weak labour market.




                      More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgar...opes-1.3974687

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        MasterCard to reduce credit card fees for CFIB member businesses


                        MasterCard and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business have struck a deal to reduce credit card interchange fee rates for CFIB's 109,000 member businesses.

                        MasterCard's interchange fees — per-purchase fees paid by retailers to the credit card companies that process their transactions — will be reduced from 1.44 per cent to 1.26 per cent for regular credit cards, effective April 3, a decrease of 12.5 per cent.

                        Interchange fee rates for MasterCard's premium cards, which are generally higher, will fall by as much as 22 per cent, according to CFIB.


                        More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/cfib...ates-1.3985767

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          January inflation reading expected to creep higher

                          Economists are expecting an increase in January's Canadian inflation rate later this week, and for figures to show that retail sales ended 2016 on a mixed note.
                          The report on the consumer price index will come Friday, two days after Statistics Canada reports on December retail activity. The consensus forecast of economists is that the year-end retail sales report will show a 0.2 per cent month-over-month increase. Factoring out auto sales, observers expect the report will show a bigger gain of 0.8 per cent.

                          BMO offered a slighter weaker forecast, projecting overall sales to be as flat auto sales give back gains made in November.



                          More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/econ...head-1.3991018

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Loblaw fourth-quarter profit up 57% to $201M

                            ​Loblaw had $11.13 billion of revenue and a $201 million net profit in the fourth quarter, according to earnings announced Thursday morning.

                            The profit amounted to 50 cents per share.

                            The net profit was up 57 per cent or $73 million from a year earlier, while revenue was up $265 million or 2.4 per cent.

                            In the fourth quarter of 2015, Loblaw had $10.87 billion of revenue and $128 million of net profit or 31 cents per share.

                            On an adjusted basis, Loblaw earned $393 million or 97 cents per share in the 2016 fourth quarter — up from $363 million or 87 cents per share in the fourth quarter of 2015.

                            Loblaw owns Canada's largest grocery business and the Shoppers Drug Mart pharmacy chain, as well as the Joe Fresh clothing business and PC Financial personal banking.


                            More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/lobl...s-q4-1.3995435

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Plenty of budget remedies offered as Liberals prepare prescription for ailing economy


                              It's that time of year again when everyone connected with politics starts looking at what could be, or more precisely, what should be in the federal budget.

                              It's the Ottawa equivalent of sharing home remedies for the common cold. There's no shortage of advice on the best way to treat whatever ails the Canadian economy.

                              More spending on infrastructure! Drop the proposed price on carbon! Impose new or more user fees! Raise the minimum wage! Incentives for key industries!


                              More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/budg...neau-1.3996850

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X