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  • Pick and pay: CRTC to unveil changes to how TV channels are packaged, sold

    Canadian consumers could be given more control over how they pay for the TV they watch in a decision being released today by the country's broadcast regulator.

    The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission is set to unveil new rules governing how cable and satellite service providers package and sell access to channels.

    The decision is the latest result from the CRTC's Let's Talk TV hearings held in the fall.

    The Harper government has been pushing the regulator to allow for a so-called pick-and-pay system that allows consumers to choose and pay only for the individual channels they want.

    More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/pick...sold-1.3001058

  • #2
    CRTC rules cable companies must offer pick-and-pay channels, $25 basic package

    The CRTC will allow subscribers to purchase a basic $25 a month cable TV or satellite package and have individualpick-and-pay options after that.

    That new cable package is capped at $25 a month and will consist of local stations and mandatory channels, such as APTN, TVO, CPAC, educational channels and accessibility channels, with the option to include up to four American "affiliate" channels (NBC, ABC, CBS and Fox), plus PBS.

    More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/crtc...kage-1.3001370

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    • #3
      CRTC 'wholesale code' change important for smaller cable companies

      Most of the media attention following Thursday's CRTC announcement focused on new "pick-and-pay" channel options and basic packages.

      However, some groups say the little-discussed proposal for a new wholesale code of conduct is key to make sure those changes work by reforming the way smaller cable companies can compete with vertically integrated giants..

      More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/crtc...nies-1.3003817

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      • #4
        Cutting the TV cord? Call the anti-cable guy

        The cable guy has a new competitor: the anti-cable guy. He helps you cut the cord on traditional television services and hooks you up with alternatives.

        Most Canadians still watch cable or satellite TV. However, cord-cutting is catching on as more people seek potentially cheaper and more versatile viewing options.

        More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/cutt...-guy-1.3005946

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        • #5
          5 TV streaming gadgets that will let you cut the cord

          Want to stream movies and shows from Netflix, YouTube and other entertainment services from the internet straight to your TV?

          Canadians can do that with a wide variety of devices ranging from simple plug-in "sticks" such as the $39 Chromecast to advanced video game consoles such as the $450 PlayStation 4.


          More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/5-...cord-1.3007496

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          • #6
            Fibre optic cable battle: Smaller players want in on Big 3 networks

            If you want a fibre optic cable – the latest, hottest connection to the internet – brace yourself for some surprises.

            When Eric Rosenquist and his wife were downsizing from their sprawling, rural acreage, they had a few items on their wish list.

            For Rosenquist, a software engineer with between 30 and 40 devices in his home connected to the web, a strong, fast internet connection was essential.

            He found that in Richardson Ridge, a housing development still under construction in the Ottawa suburb of Kanata.


            More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/fibr...orks-1.3010347

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            • #7
              Cellphone customers have bargaining power thanks to CRTC contract rule

              If your cellphone provider has been calling you unexpectedly with offers of a better deal or a free phone upgrade, it's not a fluke. Canada's big three carriers – Bell, Rogers and Telus – are preparing for an unprecedented wave of customer free-agency as a new regulation kicks in on June 3.

              And that wave could mean some good deals for people who are willing to bargain with their carrier.

              While three-year deals are still technically allowed by the CRTC, the rule will effectively kill such contracts because they forbid carriers from charging early cancellation fees after 24 months.


              More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/ce...rule-1.3087627

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              • #8
                CRTC wireless code now applies to all customers: What you need to know

                Everyone with a three-year wireless contract will be able to break their agreement as of Wednesday without the hefty cancellation fees often mandated by carriers thanks to new regulations.

                The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission's wireless code took effect on Dec. 2, 2013, but will apply to all wireless contracts signed as of June 3, 2013.

                Canada's wireless carriers attempted to prevent the code from applying to people with three-year wireless contracts that would not have expired by June 3. The carriers lost a Federal Court appeal in May when the court ruled that the CRTC can make the code applicable to those contracts even if it interferes with the rights of mobile carriers.

                More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/cr...know-1.3091045

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                • #9
                  Cord-cutting ramping up as more people flee traditional TV, report says


                  In living rooms across the country, viewers are cutting ties with conventional television and hundreds of millions of dollars are at stake.

                  A new report predicts that cord cutting is poised to gain momentum, buoyed by the growing choices and ease of use of online video streaming services, like Netflix.

                  "This is a time of significant transformational change in the traditional TV service market here in Canada," says report co-author and International Data Corporation (IDC) analyst Emily Taylor.


                  More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/cord...says-1.3169273

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                  • #10
                    Endless telemarketing calls, scams and how the big telcos could stop them

                    "If robocalls were a disease, this would be an epidemic," said one consumer advocate recently.

                    In fact, this would be the plague. And we're all suffering from it.

                    Hardly a day goes by, it seems, without a call offering a prize from WestJet, or a free room from Marriott hotels, or a threat claiming you haven't paid your taxes and could go to jail.

                    They're all fake, of course. And they're all supremely annoying.

                    Most of these calls originate overseas, many in boiler rooms in India, and they are surprisingly effective.


                    More:http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/telc...spam-1.3334194

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                    • #11
                      Cable TV price hikes could inspire more cord-cutting


                      "That for me was the final boom," says Mario Stojanac about a recent notice from Rogers that his cable TV bill is going up.

                      For some time, Stojanac has been contemplating cutting his cable and exploring alternatives like video streaming services. He feels he already pays too much — about $100 a month for big bundles of channels just to get the ones he wants: HBO and sports.

                      "I could care less for keeping those bundles," says Stojanac, a product development manager living in Mississauga, Ont.


                      More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/cord...gers-1.3435432

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                      • #12
                        CRTC rejects plea from small internet providers seeking wireless access

                        Do you think your cellphone bill is too high? Tough. It's going to stay that way thanks to a CRTC decision that nixes the possibility of dozens of new wireless carriers springing up, consumer advocates say.

                        The regulator on Thursday denied an appeal from a group of small internet providers to mandate what are called Mobile Virtual Network Operators.

                        Such businesses would rent the networks of larger telecom companies at set rates to provide alternative wireless services, likely at lower prices.

                        This group of 30 or so operators, collectively known as the Canadian Network Operators Consortium, argued that regulated MVNOs — and the extra competition they would bring — would be the best way to lower Canadian cellphone bills, which are among the highest in the world.


                        More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/crtc...sion-1.3454095

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                        • #13
                          Cable TV or bundle bills out of control? Insiders reveal how to fight for discounts


                          Feeling gouged? Overwhelmed by your cable TV bill or the cost of your phone, TV and internet bundle?

                          Maybe you had high hopes when the new $25 skinny basic TV packages came on the market — only to find your dreams dashed when you added up the extra charges.

                          The CRTC, which mandated the new packages, encourages dissatisfied customers to shop around and negotiate their own deal.

                          So CBC News spoke with industry insiders to find out the best way to bargain for a better cable or bundle plan.

                          And if you're not up for haggling, we also explain how you can hire a negotiator to do the deed for you.


                          More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/cabl...ings-1.3514746

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                          • #14
                            As complaints pile up, CRTC launches surprise review of $25 basic TV packages


                            If their $25 basic TV packages fail to meet CRTC expectations, cable companies could face trouble as they try to renew their broadcast licences.


                            In a surprise move, Canada's broadcast regulator recently demanded detailed reports on providers' new basic TV packages as part of their licence renewal process.


                            Within weeks, the commission will make those reports public. And Canadians will then be invited to wade in and tell the CRTC what they think.


                            "We'll take all those comments into consideration as we come up with a decision to renew [TV providers'] licences," said CRTC spokesman Eric Rancourt.



                            More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/crtc...c-tv-1.3579691

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                            • #15
                              Under fire at CRTC hearing, Bell promises big change to $25 basic TV plan


                              Hours before Bell Canada testified at a CRTC hearing Wednesday about its $25 basic TV package, the telco announced it will no longer force Fibe TV customers to also subscribe to the company's internet service.

                              Then, during the hearing, Bell admitted for the first time that it had designed a training document for employees that specifically told them not to promote its cheaper, basic TV plan.The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission grilled Bell on both topics during its hearing in Gatineau, Que. The event aims to address numerous complaints from dissatisfied customers about the new basic TV packages.


                              More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/bell...c-tv-1.3752176

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