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  • Rich investors worry about stock market

    The bull market of the last five years has resulted in extraordinary gains for the wealthy, but some in the 1% aren't sure how much longer the good times can roll.

    A comprehensive study of wealthy families by private bank U.S. Trust found that only 40% of high net worth investors feel "bullishly optimistic" about the market. At the same time, 10% said they felt downright pessimistic and 12% described themselves as fearful of losing money.


    More: http://money.cnn.com/2014/06/20/inve....html?iid=Lead

  • #2
    Stock futures lower after biggest drop since Oct

    U.S. stock index futures declined on Tuesday, putting the S&P 500 on track to extend losses after suffering its biggest drop since Oct. 22 in the prior session on concerns about global growth.

    The benchmark S&P index fell 0.7 percent on Monday, dragged lower on weakness in the energy sector .SPNY, which fell 3.9 percent to hit its lowest level since June 2013. The S&P 500 has climbed for seven straight weeks, closing on Friday at a new record high for the 49th time this year.

    Brent crude LCOc1 touched a fresh five-year low on Tuesday before rebounding near $67 a barrel on hopes prices in the commodity may be bottoming. [O/R]


    More: http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/...0JN1BJ20141209

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    • #3
      Selloff slows as timid loan take-up boosts bets on ECB QE

      A selloff in world stocks slowed on Thursday as oil prices steadied at a five-year low and lacklustre demand for virtually- free ECB money stoked expectations the bank will have to resort to full-blown quantitative easing.

      Banks borrowed 130 billion euro of four-year loans from the European Central Bank, taking barely more than half of the total money that had been offered this year as the euro zone's economy continues to struggle.


      More: http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/...0JP02I20141211

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      • #4
        European stocks rise third day amid expectations of ECB stimulus

        European stocks advanced for a third day, extending their highest level since 2008, amid investor expectations the European Central Bank will announce a plan for quantitative easing this week.

        The Stoxx Europe 600 Index added 0.7 percent to 354.75 at 2:11 p.m. in London. Stocks climbed to a 7-year high on Friday as rising oil producers outweighed a slump in Swiss shares. Switzerland’s SMI Index rebounded 3.9 percent today after posting its worst week since 2008 following the Swiss National Bank’s surprise move to end a cap on the franc.

        “Expectations of more liquidity measures from the ECB have spurred European markets higher,” said Guillermo Hernandez Sampere, who helps manage about 150 million euros ($174 million) at MPPM EK in Eppstein, Germany. “The market is waiting for Thursday’s ECB decision and how big the QE program will be. Mr Draghi’s fight against deflation will open the next chapter.”


        More: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2015-0...end-gains.html

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        • #5
          Top U.S. CEOs reaped billions from stock gains in recent years

          CEOs at large U.S. companies collectively realized at least $6 billion more in compensation than initially estimated in annual disclosures in the five years after the financial crisis first hit, according to a Reuters analysis. The reason for the windfall: the soaring value of their stock awards.

          About 300 CEOs who served throughout the 2009-2013 period at S&P 500 companies together realized about $22 billion in compensation in the form of pay, bonuses and share and option grants, or an average of $73 million each, figures provided by executive compensation data firm Equilar show.

          More: http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/...0ML0AX20150325

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          • #6
            Frugality of high earners in U.S. shows long shadow of recession

            The nearly rich aren’t spending nearly enough, a trend that’s weighing on U.S. growth.

            Six years after the worst recession since the 1930s, Americans who earn $100,000 to $249,999 a year still are “making very careful decisions” when it comes to discretionary purchases, said Pam Danziger, president of Unity Marketing Inc., a luxury research company based in Stevens, Pennsylvania. “That’s smart for them, but it’s certainly not good for the economy.”


            More: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articl...w-of-recession

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