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  • #16
    Barrier to treatment: Getting teenage addicts to accept help can be difficult


    Brent Clark knew it would be difficult to find his daughter a place to detox safely in Ottawa before getting help for her drug addiction. He's since discovered an even greater hurdle: getting an addict to accept the help in the first place.
    Clark's 17-year-old daughter was supposed to start treatment at the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre on Tuesday, but when the time came she refused to go.
    Chloe Clark, who CBC News first interviewed on Sunday, said she had been trying to detox on her own but took Percocet on Saturday, and that her withdrawal symptoms were too bad to go into treatment. She said she needed to detox first.


    More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...ment-1.3993253

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    • #17
      Kanata parents with drug-addicted children go to meeting hoping for answers

      Sean O'Leary expected "about 10, maybe 20 people" would turn out for a Thursday night meeting he organized.

      Instead, about 200 parents, many of them grim-faced, packed a meeting room at the Kanata Recreation Complex, looking for answers and mutual support as they struggle to help their teenage children who are addicted to opioids.


      More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...ocet-1.3996872

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      • #18
        Ottawa paramedics boosting supply of opioid antidote naloxone

        Ottawa paramedics are carrying a larger supply of the opioid overdose antidote naloxone aboard ambulances and in their equipment bags, according to a memo to city council.

        According to the memo from Anthony Di Monte, general manager of emergency and protective services, the Ottawa Paramedic Service has been boosting its naloxone inventory after noticing "an increase in opioid-related calls."



        More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...oses-1.4001758

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        • #19
          Barrier to treatment: Getting teenage addicts to accept help can be difficult

          Brent Clark knew it would be difficult to find his daughter a place to detox safely in Ottawa before getting help for her drug addiction. He's since discovered an even greater hurdle: getting an addict to accept the help in the first place.

          Clark's 17-year-old daughter was supposed to start treatment at the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre on Tuesday, but when the time came she refused to go.
          Chloe Clark, who CBC News first interviewed on Sunday, said she had been trying to detox on her own but took Percocet on Saturday, and that her withdrawal symptoms were too bad to go into treatment. She said she needed to detox first.


          More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...ment-1.3993253

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          • #20
            $2.5M not enough to fund city's opioid fight, frontline workers say

            The $2.5 million in funding the province has promised the City of Ottawa to deal with its opioid crisis is not enough, according to some community health officials on the front lines of the fight against the potentially lethal drugs.


            Ontario, and other provinces, are about 10 years behind on properly addressing the issue, according to Rob Boyd, executive director of the Oasis Program at the Sandy Hill Community Health Centre.


            "We've got a system that's been chronically under funded for decades, and we are not prepared for what has come upon us," said Boyd.


            More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...ough-1.4014054

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            • #21
              'A very dangerous time': opioid meetings continue to draw parents in big numbers

              Once again, hundreds of parents filled a meeting space in Kanata to talk about how to tackle opioid drug use.

              Ottawa Public Health officials gave a half-hour information session on fentanyl and counterfeit prescription drugs Wednesday night. The event, one of four scheduled this month, was hosted by the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board at Earl of March Secondary School.

              About 200 people, most of them parents of teens or pre-teens, watched the presentation on the signs and dangers of opioid drug use.




              More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...arch-1.4016274

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              • #22
                How to administer naloxone in case of opioid overdose

                As opioid overdoses due to powerful drugs such as fentanyl rise in Ottawa, the antidote naloxone is becoming a household name, with public health officials promoting its use throughout the city to save lives. There are two kinds of naloxone applications to treat opioid overdoses: the intramuscular kit, which uses a needle to inject naloxone right into arm or thigh muscle, and the intranasal spray, which is injected right up a patient's nostril.



                More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...oses-1.4019291

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                • #23
                  Alcohol abuse clinic reducing return trips to Ottawa emergency rooms

                  A pilot project aimed at reducing the number of alcoholics who make return visits to Ottawa hospital emergency rooms is showing some promising results halfway into its mandate.

                  The Alcohol Medical Intervention Clinic (AMIC), located at the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre, was established in May 2016 as a two-year pilot project with a different approach to the treatment of alcohol abuse.

                  Dr. Kim Corace, director of the Royal's substance abuse and disorders program, said the Royal teamed up with the Ottawa Hospital for the pilot.

                  Over the past year the hospital has referred 250 to 300 people to the program, and Corace said 60 per cent have followed through with treatment.



                  More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...tawa-1.4082100

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                  • #24
                    Parent of drug-addicted teen pushes for easier access to Suboxone

                    An Ottawa father who raised concerns about teenage drug addiction and overdoses in Kanata is now pushing for easier access to Suboxone, a medication that helps addicts fight cravings and get through withdrawals.

                    Sean O'Leary said Suboxone has enabled his 16-year-old daughter Paige fight her addiction to counterfeit Percocet.


                    More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...xone-1.4092759

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                    • #25
                      Drug overdoses in Ottawa on the rise, ER data suggests


                      Hospital emergency departments in Ottawa dealt with an average of 21 drug overdoses per week in late 2016, and 24 per week in early 2017, according to new data released by Ottawa Public Health.

                      The figures capture emergency department visits by people between the ages of 10 and 64 who were in life-threatening or potentially life-threatening condition, from the second week of October 2016 to the end of March 2017.

                      The figures don't include people who may have overdosed but didn't access an emergency department.



                      More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...nths-1.4081038

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                      • #26
                        Desperate parents of drug-addicted teens turning to Ottawa group for help


                        A grassroots parents' group in Ottawa recently set up to tackle teen opioid drug abuse is now drawing national attention.

                        The organization We the Parents formed at the beginning of May and already has a strong online presence and is now fielding calls from concerned parents from across the country.

                        "In the last eight days I've spoken to 14 different parents who've lost a child, most of them in the last year or so. And a few of them just a few months ago. I think I have good conversations because I live with the fear of it. The reality it could be me any day," said Sean O'Leary, co-founder of We the Parents.



                        More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...tawa-1.4124806

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                        • #27
                          More than 100 overdoses seen at Ottawa emergency rooms in April


                          Doctors who work in the Queensway-Carleton Hospital's emergency room say they're continuing to see patients coming in with serious drug overdoses that need immediate intervention and resuscitation.

                          According to new numbers released Thursday by Ottawa Public Health, all of Ottawa's emergency departments are busy dealing with overdoses — with 108 reported in April alone.

                          Public health officials are now releasing overdose statistics as part of a new public awareness initiative.



                          More: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...pril-1.4132181

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